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April

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    MPlib
    Here's more evidence of Mr Harper's bad choices - tax breaks for the wealthy vs proper attention to public safety http://bc.liberal.ca/news-notes/media-releases/harpers-marine-safety-cuts-putting-bcs-economy-environment-risk-liberal-government-reopen-vancouver-coast-guard-station/
    Apr 10, 2015 1:28 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Every govt has to make choices - the Harper govt has chosen tax breaks for wealthier folks over key things like public safety http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/../../ralph-goodale/harper-public-safety_b_7036340.html
    Apr 10, 2015 1:25 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Joining Justin Trudeau in sending greetings on Orthodox Easter this weekend http://www.liberal.ca/statement-by-liberal-party-of-canada-leader-justin-trudeau-on-orthodox-easter/
    Apr 10, 2015 9:00 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Hey, if you are in the Ottawa area on Tuesday morning (April 14), come for this Canada 2020 breakfast event
    Apr 10, 2015 6:55 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    PUBLIC SAFETY vs. INCOME SPLITTING FOR THE WEALTHY As Stephen Harper's government fills the airwaves with messages of fear, war and terror -- talking about anything but the faltering Canadian economy -- it's important to ask if Conservatives are putting their money where their mouth is. Given all of Mr. Harper's heated rhetoric, you would think that agencies responsible for public safety -- like the RCMP, for example -- would be at the top of the government's priority list. But think again. Since 2010, annual funding for the Mounties has declined in every year except one. The cuts add up to $598-million, or 18%. After five years of inflation are taken into account, the real effect is a budget reduction of 26%. The amount allocated by the government specifically for the RCMP's key anti-terrorism unit (known as "INSET") has been frozen ever since the Harper government came to power, even though the actual costs of that unit have more than tripled. But that's not all. In addition to overt cuts and long-term freezes, there is also the sometimes insidious practice of "lapsing". That's where the funding for an agency (like the RCMP) gets announced by the government, voted by Parliament, and then a big chunk goes unused. It "lapses" and reverts to the government's central treasury. This is what happened to about $10-million that had been ear-marked for the fight against child pornography. It was never utilized. Overall, over the past five years, more than a billion dollars in funding commitments to the RCMP have "lapsed". Is the loss of that huge amount of money just bad management, or budget-cutting in disguise? And what are the consequences? The policing and security work of the RCMP get compromised. After the terrible events in St. Jean-sur-Richelieu, at the National War Memorial and on Parliament Hill last October, more police officers were required for national security. RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson testified to Parliamentary Committees that as many as 600 personnel had to be reassigned to that type of duty -- taken away from the fight against organized crime, white collar crime, drugs and gangs. Given their inadequate resources, the Mounties have been forced to rob Peter to pay Paul. In addition, forensic labs in Regina, Winnipeg and Halifax have been closed. And the national criminal records database has been allowed to deteriorate under a serious backlog. This is what you get when the Harper government fails to "walk the talk" on public safety. The Conservatives claim they need to put new powers in the law, but police forces and security officers cannot fully utilize the laws already there when their budgets don't give them the necessary resources. And new laws will be meaningless without the funding to make them work. And it's not just the RCMP. Failures to properly support public safety agencies are riddled throughout the Harper regime: Maritime search and rescue. The border agency. The Canadian Security Intelligence Service and the Security Intelligence Review Committee. National Defence and Veterans Affairs. The prison system. Canada's emergency planning and response programs. Transportation safety -- rail, air, marine and surface. Not to mention environmental protection and food safety. The well-being of Canadians is put at risk when these things are undermined. So why is this happening? It all goes back to Stephen Harper's promise to a wealthy fraction of Canadians to provide them with a multi-billion-dollar tax break called "Income Splitting", just as soon as he could declare a balanced budget. So honest or not, dangerous or not, Mr. Harper has been prepared to compromise even public safety to concoct the claim of a balanced budget before the 2015 election. A great many things have been sacrificed on that altar. And for what? So a small number of folks with incomes above $233,000 can get the biggest tax breaks.
    Apr 10, 2015 6:04 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Full house tonight at The Artesian for Jeffery Straker's new CD launch in Regina. Congrats. Break a leg!
    Apr 09, 2015 7:15 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Towering columns of Canada's Vimy Ridge Memorial in France - remembered today on 98th anniversary of Canada's great battle!
    Apr 09, 2015 10:07 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Did you know - more than 2/3 of all of Canada's federal debt today is attributable to either Mulroney or Harper! Paragons of fiscal virtue!
    Apr 08, 2015 10:26 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    QUIZ: Adding to Finance Minister Oliver's fiscal hypocrisy, how many Conservative governments balanced budgets for Canada in the 20th century? ANSWER: One! It was Robert Borden in 1912, more than a 100 yrs ago. And it lasted for just 1 year. Note: Borden was a school teacher.
    Apr 08, 2015 10:09 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    The new Harper debt created under this government amounts to $4400 for every man, women and newborn Canadian child! The Harper government has increased the federal tax burden in each of its past 5 budgets - by a cumulative total of some $10 billion. Stephen Harper has the worst record on economic growth of any Prime Minister since RB Bennett in the Dirty Thirties!
    Apr 08, 2015 9:56 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Finance Minister Oliver says Canadians trust Harper's judgment? Remember Duffy, Brazeau, Porter, Carson, Penashue, Del Mastro...some judgment!
    Apr 08, 2015 9:48 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Listening to fiscal hypocrisy of Finance Minister Joe Oliver. HarperCons wouldn't recognize a balanced budget because they've never truly produced one!
    Apr 08, 2015 9:41 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    It's spring! Well into April!
    Apr 07, 2015 7:27 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    GOVERNOR POLOZ CUTS THROUGH CONSERVATIVE DENIAL The Governor of the Bank of Canada, Stephen Poloz, is developing quite a knack for graphic turns-of-phrase that debunk the misleading "talking points" of the Harper government. While the Conservatives downplay youth unemployment stuck at recession-like levels, and cut their support for summer jobs, Governor Poloz sounds the alarm about 200,000 jobless and under-employed young Canadians. He highlights the hard truth that far too many are still living in their parents' basements because the economy isn't strong enough to let them get started on their own. The Conservatives try to fudge the impact of a 50% drop in the value of oil markets. Harper Ministers claim it will help manufacturing and ease Alberta's problem with "temporary foreign workers". But Governor Poloz is blunt -- he says the impact of the lost investment, jobs and exports is "unambiguously negative", and he surprises everyone by cutting interest rates. When the Conservatives boast about their "jobs and growth" record using stale data from four and five years ago, Governor Poloz punctures their balloon by describing Canada's most recent economic performance as nothing less than "atrocious". He also says we're staying out of another recession right now only because the Bank of Canada is providing "considerable monetary stimulus". Which leads directly to this question: Why is the austere fiscal policy of the Harper government contradicting the accommodative monetary policy of the central Bank? Governor Poloz has reduced interest rates to stimulate the economy and drive growth, but Mr. Harper is all about hacking and slashing federal budgets which pushes in the opposite direction. Surely Canada's most urgent economic imperative is greater growth. We haven't seen much since 2008. Economic growth is essential to lift the well-being of the middle-class and all those working so hard just to get there. It's also the key to balancing the federal government's books on any sustained and durable basis. But the latest figures from Statistics Canada show an economy that's not just slowing down. It's actually shrinking. That's what Governor Poloz is worried about. And he uses strong language -- "unambiguously negative", "atrocious" and "falling back into recession" -- for good reason. A paltry 121,000 new jobs were created in the whole country in all of 2014. Employment generation is thus down by more than 60% from two years earlier. Joblessness is up and getting worse. Job quality is at its lowest ebb in 25 years. The country has just posted yet another monthly trade deficit. Business confidence is headed down toward recession-like levels. Consumers are carrying record household debts at 165% of disposable incomes. In the retail sector, sales are down and many major stores have disappeared or down-sized -- Target, Zellers, Sears, Mexx, Smart Set, Jacob, Sony, Future Shop, and on it goes. Based on these realities, it's clear that Canada needs a new economic plan. Mr. Harper's plan has failed. For years, he has contorted everything toward one main initiative -- a large, expensive tax break which pays-off most of all for the most wealthy. The late Jim Flaherty warned against it because it's too costly and unfair. The Parliamentary Budget Officer says it does nothing for growth. Meanwhile, real instruments of growth -- like investments in public infrastructure, higher education and skills, scientific research and innovation -- are left idle. And one final point -- as the master of monetary policy, the Bank of Canada really has only one tool to help drive growth, and that's lower interest rates. But that carries with it the very real risk of adding to what is already record-high levels of consumer debt. Should the central Bank encourage households to go even further in debt? Perhaps not, but that's what you get when a worn and derelict federal government sits idle, leaving the whole burden to be carried by the Bank of Canada alone.
    Apr 06, 2015 8:25 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Happy Easter!
    Apr 05, 2015 7:20 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Happy to drop in on Rachel Clarke's 100th birthday party today in Regina - pictured here with grandson Aaron.
    Apr 04, 2015 1:51 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Good Friday at St Paul's Anglican Cathedral in Regina.
    Apr 03, 2015 11:24 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Apr 02, 2015 4:17 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    FINALLY, A BUDGET DATE! The elusive Joe Oliver – Finance Minister-in-hiding – surfaced briefly at a clothing plant in Toronto today to announce the 2015 Federal Budget date. It’s Tuesday, April 21st. And way overdue. The gap between the last budget (Feb. 11/14) and this next one will exceed a full federal fiscal year. With a weak economy that’s been limping along since the last recession six years ago, and with the more recent over-burden of a troubled energy sector shredding jobs, investments and exports – the Harper government has been largely missing-in-action. Through the last three months, the Finance Minister has made only five cameo appearances in the House of Commons Question Period. He seems incapable of defending himself or the government’s less-than-stellar economic performance. He certainly fails to inspire confidence. That was evident again today when Mr. Oliver devoted most of his air-time to a turgid attack on Justin Trudeau and the Liberals. It was petty, filled with falsehoods and distortions, and sounded rather desperate. The Harper Conservatives are clearly spooked. Mr. Trudeau is offering three key things to Canadians that Mr. Harper cannot: First, a positive ambitious vision of what Canadians can accomplish when they pull together (as opposed to Mr. Harper’s “wedges” of fear and division and his endless grinding mediocrity). Mr. Trudeau is riveted on the well-being of the middle-class and all those working so hard just to get there, and that’s the prime determinant of both a successful economy and a healthy democracy. Second, a strong team of both seasoned veterans and exciting new people who have excellent economic credentials. Through the past quarter-century, Liberals have been the ones to practice fiscal responsibility, eliminate deficits, reduce debt and invest in growth. Mr. Harper’s legacy is $10-billion in higher taxes over the past five years, $157-billion in new Harper debt, deficient job quantity and quality, and the worst growth record of any Prime Minister in eight decades. Third, a plan to drive greater investment in real economic growth and jobs to rekindle confidence among Canadians. Transformative infrastructure. Better access to higher learning and skills. Science and innovation. More effective trade. Environmental credibility leading to better markets. These are some of the main building-blocks of sustained and sustainable growth upon which a more prosperous Canada can be built. By contrast, the Harper plan is one thing only – a large tax break (Income Splitting) mostly for wealthier people. Even the late Jim Flaherty found it unpalatable. He felt it was too expensive (more than $2-billion every year), and unfair (86% of Canadian households will never qualify and the biggest gains go to those earning more than $233,000). It worsens inequality and detracts from economic growth. All these worries have recently been confirmed independently by the Parliamentary Budget Officer. At a time when the economy is actually shrinking, business confidence is at a six-year low, unemployment is rising, and job quality is the worst it’s been in 25 years, it’s no wonder the Governor of the Bank of Canada calls the situation “atrocious”. He says “considerable monetary stimulus” is required just to keep Canada from falling back into recession. And the best Mr. Harper can do is stall the budget until he concocts some political “spin” to camouflage his big tax break for Canada’s most wealthy. Watch for the multi-million-dollar advertising campaign that’s about to inundate the nation. No jobs, no growth, just advertising!
    Apr 02, 2015 11:07 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Finance Minister Oliver continues his tawdry behaviour. Mostly absent for the past 3 months, he surfaces today to announce a budget date. Strange that Mr Oliver spent most of his time attacking false interpretations of the economic positions of the Liberal Party. Bank of Canada Governor Poloz says without "substantial stimulus" the Canadian economy would fall back into recession.
    Apr 02, 2015 6:19 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    The House of Commons has just voted on Justin Trudeau's Private Members Bill to provide Canadians with greater access to government information and more overall transparency. The Harper Conservatives voted unaimously against. This is the most secretive and manipulative regime in Canadian history!
    Apr 01, 2015 4:08 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Another shambolic Question Period for HarperCons. Pointed questions about Jobs + Growth produce vacuous fluff from the government. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1bhNw8bbOI
    Apr 01, 2015 1:53 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Il y a 50 ans un fédéralisme coopératif & constructif réalisait le RPC/RRQ. Mais il reste des défis à relever sur la sécurité du revenu. http://quebec.huffingtonpost.ca/ralph-goodale/regime-de-pensions-du-canada-50-ans_b_6980032.html
    Apr 01, 2015 1:17 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    This week's 50th anniversary of the CPP/QPP celebrates a great accomplishment, but also signals what still remains to be done http://www.liberal.ca/the-cpp-at-50-rg/
    Apr 01, 2015 1:16 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    In Question Period: From 2 years ago, job creation under HarperCons has plummeted by 191,000 jobs - because economic growth has collapsed. Stats Canada reports our economy has actually started to shrink. HarperCons seem content being called "atrocious" by Bank of Canada. Since HarperCons have no econ growth plan, the Bank of Canada has to use Monetary policy which risks worsening household debt. Household debt already at 165% of GDP, but without accommodative monetary policy, the Bank of Canada says Canada risks falling back into recession.
    Apr 01, 2015 12:10 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    In reply to questions from Justin Trudeau, Mr. Harper cannot explain his cut of $9 million from youth employment programs. Neither can Mr Harper explain his squandering of another $7.5 million on tax-paid government advertising to prop up the Conservative Party.
    Apr 01, 2015 11:45 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    In Question Period, Stephen Harper says he wants to write the Liberal Platform - say what? He can't even get a budget out on time!
    Apr 01, 2015 11:41 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana

March

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    MPlib
    Justin Trudeau at briefing tonight on his Private Member's Bill C-613 about greater federal government transparency + access to information
    Mar 31, 2015 4:03 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    In Question Period: Once again we have "No Show Joe", the Finance Minister is missing-in-action - just as "growth" stats show economy shrinking. HarperCons live on myths + fictions - the jobs they brag about were 3, 4 + 5 years ago - recent figures show worst jobs record in 40 years. HarperCons assert they "never raise taxes", but the truth fails them - through their last 5 budgets they've hiked taxes by $10 billion.
    Mar 31, 2015 11:56 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    The Conservatives’ spin on jobs is getting rather stale
    Mar 30, 2015 2:56 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    HarperCon MPs rant about high-debt/high-taxes. But their own government has ADDED $10 billion in new taxes and $157 billion in new federal debt. Harper government undermines the Bank of Canada—instead of driving growth, Cons only policy is a costly, unfair, no growth tax break for wealthy.
    Mar 30, 2015 1:21 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    In Question Period, Finance Minister Oliver is reduced to clownish behaviour - PMO spin lines instead of substantive answers about growth + jobs. It is true that all governments practise politics, but people generally expect the Finance Minister, of all Ministers, to rise above the foolishly partisan. The Finance Minister's job is to inspire confidence. To squander his reputation on mindless bumpersticker slogans diminishes his value. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpK0UpEtN8s
    Mar 30, 2015 11:42 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    There's an anniversary this week that deserves some celebration—the Canada Pension Plan is 50 years old! http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/ralph-goodale/canada-pension-plan_b_6967640.html The Huffington Post Canada
    Mar 30, 2015 10:33 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    THE CANADA PENSION PLAN AT 50! Lester Pearson was a remarkable Canadian. We first came to know him as a proficient global statesman, skilled in the diplomacy of multilateralism. He assisted at the birth of the United Nations, invented the concept of peace-keeping, and won the Nobel Peace Prize. In 1963, he became Prime Minister of Canada. Five years in that job, Mr. Pearson never once had a majority in Parliament, but still he led one of the most productive governments in Canadian history. This past February, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of Canada's Red Maple Leaf Flag -- one of Mr. Pearson's proudest accomplishments. Next year, we'll mark the 50th anniversary of national medicare, another Pearsonian legacy. And this week, the legislation that originally created the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) will turn 50 years old. It passed the House of Commons on March 29th, 1965, was approved in the Senate on April 1st and received Royal Assent on April 3rd. The CPP and its Quebec counterpart came into effect on January 1st, 1966. The stated purpose of the Canada Pension Plan was to ensure all working Canadians have an opportunity to retire in dignity. It builds on basic Old Age Security to achieve greater social justice linked to progress in the economy. Established by federal-provincial agreement, the CPP is a mandatory contributory plan into which all employees and employers pay regular premiums. That money is invested to generate the returns necessary to cover the plan's benefits. As such, CPP contributions are essential long-term investments in portable retirement incomes for a large portion of Canadians, supporting their future living standards. That sounds like common sense today, but 50 years ago it took extraordinary vision, diplomacy, negotiation and persistence to get it done. National Health and Welfare Minister, Judy LaMarsh, was a dynamo at the centre of the action. Quebec Premier Jean Lesage was pivotal, along with Ontario's John Robarts. Stanley Knowles and Paul Martin Sr. were constant Parliamentary advocates. And Lester Pearson provided the driving determination. The CPP was an historic accomplishment! But by the 1990's -- with longer life expectancies, aging demographics and escalating unfunded liabilities -- doubts had arisen about the future soundness of the Canada Pension Plan. Would it run out of money? Was the investment strategy getting adequate returns? Were the benefits supportable? Was the administration strong, efficient and independent? The plan clearly required major renovations to save it, and that would take federal-provincial consensus, which is always hard to get. As part of a multi-pronged effort to restore fiscal integrity to the Government of Canada, then-federal Finance Minister Paul Martin Jr. decided to tackle the CPP challenge. He found a key ally in the Provincial Treasurer of Alberta, Jim Dinning. Ontario Finance Minister Ernie Eves was also helpful. Together, they built the business case, the social consensus and the national momentum to rejuvenate the CPP. It's an interesting historical footnote that saving the plan earned strong support across Canada -- except for provincial NDP governments in British Columbia and Saskatchewan, and Stephen Harper and his Reform (now Conservative) Party. Today, the CPP ranks as one of only a handful of successful public pension plans worldwide. Its administration is competent and cost-effective. It's a distinct fund, independently managed according to investment policies that are free from political interference. It has a proven track-record as an international leader in the pension industry, generating world-class rates of return. External actuaries have recently judged the CPP to be sound and secure for another 75 years (the maximum actuaries will go). Because it's been neglected for the past 9 years, the CPP is labouring under one major limitation. The maximum regular benefit a contributor can receive is just over $12,000 per year. The average is just more than half that. Those amounts are far from sufficient to ensure retirees can maintain their quality of life, without other significant savings. But the typical 35-year-old today is saving less than half of what their parents did at that age. Three-quarters of those working in the private sector don't have access to an employer-sponsored pension plan. And of those who are within 10 years of retirement, fewer than one-third have $100,000 or more set aside to sustain themselves. Another third have no retirement savings at all. While they have tinkered with various private sector pension adjustments, the Harper government has not been helpful in dealing with basic retirement income insecurity. They eliminated previous investment tools like Income Trusts, destroying about $25-billion in value formerly in the savings accounts of some 2-million Canadians. They are delaying eligibility for Old Age Security and the Guaranteed Income Supplement by two years, which will take nearly $30,000 from the lowest-income and most vulnerable seniors -- most often women living alone. And Mr. Harper has vetoed every suggestion to upgrade the CPP. All of which is to say: Canada has big challenges to face in the immediate future if we're to honour Lester Pearson's ambition of a fair, efficient, adequate system of retirement income for all Canadians.
    Mar 30, 2015 5:51 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Congrats to Dr Roberta McKay for sponsoring Sask Healthcare Excellence Awards - tonight for the 13th time! Thank You!
    Mar 28, 2015 6:18 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    PP-PI: dropped into an interesting meeting in Regina about Community Pastures - concerned about Harper government's destruction of PFRA assets
    Mar 28, 2015 12:34 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Visiting a well-attended public workshop this morning in Regina hosted by the Islamic Social Services Association(ISSA). Mayor Fougere here, City Police +many others who provide social+public services in Regina - intercultural learning about Islam.
    Mar 28, 2015 8:31 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    THE FINANCE MINISTER SILENT, IN HIDING! As glum news continues to cascade over the Canadian economy, federal Finance Minister Joe Oliver never seems to be available to answer any questions about his stewardship. He's frequently spotted in Ottawa, but hasn't stood up to account for himself in Question Period since March 10th. In fact, Mr. Oliver has answered questions in the House of Commons on only four days in all of 2015 -- three of those back in January. His muzzling is quite deliberate. He is not a convincing spokesperson for the government's ineffectual policies -- he's not adept at making silk purses out of sow's ears. Furthermore, with the Conservative economic record in tatters, the government wants to talk about anything but the nation's finances. That's why Mr. Oliver has been benched and you hear non-stop about fear, hate, war and terror. When you have counted almost exclusively on the energy sector to drive the national economy, and prices in that sector collapse in half, you would think the Finance Minister would have something to say -- something to ease anxiety and build confidence. When the Bank of Canada calls the situation "unambiguously negative" and takes monetary policy in a direction completely opposite to the government's fiscal policy, you would think the Finance Minister would have something to say. When that monetary policy could be contributing to household debt loads that are already near 165% of disposable incomes and global commentators are warning of a risky housing bubble in several parts of Canada, you would think the Finance Minister would have something to say. When you're already suffering the worst economic growth record in 80 years, and all the major forecasters -- from the private banks to the Bank of Canada, the IMF and the OECD -- are projecting even slower growth immediately ahead, you would think the Finance Minister would have something to say. When the pace of new job creation is at its lowest ebb (outside of actual recessions) in all the nearly 40-years that records have been kept, and job quality is the worst it's been in a quarter of a century, you would think the Finance Minister would have something to say. When youth unemployment remains at double-digit levels nearly six years after the last recession ended, and there are 166,000 fewer jobs for young Canadians than before that recession began, you would think the Finance Minister would have something to say. When, among those now nearing retirement, more than two-thirds have less than $100,000 saved-up to sustain themselves and one-third have no retirement savings at all, you would think the Finance Minister would have something to say. But he remains tightly muzzled, just as the government remains in deep denial about the economic realities confronting Canada's middle-class, and all those working so hard just to get there. What's required is an urgent federal budget investing in the real drivers of economic growth and jobs -- namely, transformative infrastructure, higher learning and skills, innovation, effective trade and marketing, and environmental credibility that earns greater market access. Instead, the Harper government is obsessed with one thing only -- an Income Splitting tax break profoundly skewed to the wealthy. It will cost over $2-billion every year and benefit fewer than 15% of Canadian households. The biggest winners are those with incomes of $233,000. It worsens inequality and does nothing for growth. No wonder the Finance Minister is speechless.
    Mar 28, 2015 7:00 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    This weekend marks 50 years since the House of Commons passed legislation creating the Canada Pension Plan (CPP/QPP)
    Mar 28, 2015 6:00 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Jill Morgan + Stefani Langenegger hosting CBC's "Future40" reception - honouring 40 of Sask's great young people #CBCFuture40
    Mar 27, 2015 5:38 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    Some of the "Future40" young people recognized by CBC-Sk this year.
    Mar 27, 2015 5:34 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    Budgets don’t write themselves! The HarperCons’ inability to produce one on time, in a whole fiscal year, does NOT inspire confidence.
    Mar 26, 2015 2:23 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Whistling by the grave yard! HarperCons can't even acknowledge the hard truth about their LOW-GROWTH economic policies
    Mar 26, 2015 12:25 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Here's the written text of the 2 economic questions I asked today in Question Period and which HarperCons could not answer: 1. Alberta is the epi-centre of the energy downturn, and yet Premier Prentice was able to table a budget today – on time, in THIS fiscal year. Premier Wall did the same last week in Saskatchewan. Economists that advise THIS government say there’s NO credible reason for further procrastination. Will the Minister stop playing peek-a-boo with Canadians and table a Budget investing in the real drivers of economic growth – transformative infrastructure, access to higher learning, innovation, effective trade, environmental credibility. Will he do that … in THIS fiscal year? 2. Decent economic growth is NOT Canada’s reality. And despite this government’s boasting -- they’re NOT doing better than the rest of the world! Last fall – BEFORE the oil downturn – the IMF projected 139 countries would grow FASTER this year than Canada. In the OECD, there are 16, including even Greece. More recently, the OECD has downgraded Canadian growth, while upgrading many others – the US, Europe, Japan, Germany, France, India. Why is this government content to have the worst economic growth record in eight decades? Again, the Finance Minister was MIA!
    Mar 26, 2015 11:40 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Dealing conscientiously with both security and rights! Here are Liberal amendments proposed to correct errors in Bill C-51. http://www.liberal.ca/liberals-unveil-amendments-to-address-canadians-concerns-on-bill-c-51/
    Mar 26, 2015 9:50 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    On jobs, HarperCons cite outdated stats from up to 6 years ago - demonstrating that their jobs record is a sad joke. Jobs growth for 15 months is at a 40 year low. In 2014, jobs growth was down from 2013, and 2013 was also down from 2012. Once again, amidst weakening economic news - more joblessness, less growth - the federal Finance Minister cannot be found.
    Mar 25, 2015 12:02 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    In Question Period, Justin Trudeau quotes StatsCda data revealing that Canada is suffering its poorest employment growth in 40 years, And furthermore, TD Economics is projecting a worsening unemployment rate through 2015. In reply, Mr Harper can name not a single policy to boost jobs+growth. He clings to his expensive, unfair tax break for the wealthy.
    Mar 25, 2015 11:48 am | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Marc Garneau and I in Question Period pressed HarperCons on their record of producing less than 1% annual growth in jobs for 15 long months. With year-over-year job growth/month averaging about 0.6% for 15 long months, HarperCons have the worst record in nearly 40 years. HarperCons insist on Income Splitting for the wealthy, defying the advice of late Jim Flaherty who said it was too costly and unfair. The Conservative Finance Minister again refuses to respond to economic questions about pathetic quantity and quality of Canadian Jobs. HarperCons cite job stats from 3-5 years ago because current data contradicts their phoney spin lines, yet offer nothing more for Infrastructure.
    Mar 23, 2015 12:03 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    Congrats to Lorrie, CC and Buzz for Z99's amazing 2015 Radiothon raising funds the the Hospitals of Regina Foundation - neonatal - $770,001!!!! Great job!
    Mar 22, 2015 9:10 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana
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    MPlib
    A huge crowd today at Regina's Italian Club for this year's "Spring Free from Racism" - celebrating Canada's diversity at a vital time!
    Mar 22, 2015 12:47 pm | Saskatchewan, Wascana

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