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            • MPnews news Government of Canada supports economic opportunities for women - Canada NewsWire (press release)
              FORT MCMURRAY, AB, July 10, 2015 /CNW/ - The Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch, Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women, and David Yurdiga, Member of Parliament for Fort McMurray—Athabasca, highlighted measures put in place by the ... read more
              Jul 10, 2015 10:20 am> |
              • MPnews news Stephen Harper déclenche quatre partielles fédérales, en Ontario et en Alberta - 98,5 fm
                Les deux autres scrutins se dérouleront en Alberta, afin de remplacer les députés démissionnaires conservateurs Brian Jean et Ted Menzies dans les circonscriptions de Fort McMurray—Athabasca et de Macleod. Les conservateurs s'attendent à garder ces ...and more » read more
                May 11, 2014 4:42 pm> |
                  • MPnews news The Difference Between A Conservative And A Libertarian In One Ad - Huffington Post Canada
                    The Libertarian Party of Canada favours the elimination of government interference in the lives of citizens. The party has ... The seat for Fort McMurray—Athabasca opened up after the surprise resignation of Conservative MP Brian Jean in January. Soon ...and more » read more
                    Mar 06, 2014 1:46 pm> |
                    • MPnews news The Difference Between A Conservative And A Libertarian In One Ad - Huffington Post Canada
                      The Libertarian Party of Canada favours the elimination of government interference in the lives of citizens. The party has ... The seat for Fort McMurray—Athabasca opened up after the surprise resignation of Conservative MP Brian Jean in January. Soon ...and more » read more
                      Mar 06, 2014 7:53 am> |
                      • MPnews news The Difference Between A Conservative And A Libertarian In One Ad - Huffington Post Canada
                        The Libertarian Party of Canada favours the elimination of government interference in the lives of citizens. The party has ... The seat for Fort McMurray—Athabasca opened up after the surprise resignation of Conservative MP Brian Jean in January. Soon ...and more » read more
                        Mar 06, 2014 7:50 am> |
                          • MPndpblog Malcolm_AllenMP 275 post Northwest Territories Devolution Act

                            Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my friend from Sudbury, who mentioned my tie. Just to let folks know, this is the official tartan of my hometown of Glasgow. There is a plug for the European City of the Year in 1998.

                            Nonetheless, in contrast to how our colleagues on the other side, many of whom come from Alberta, would see the national energy program, which the Liberals hoisted upon them many years ago, how must folks in the north feel? I have been to Yellowknife on occasion. It is a wonderful place. How must they feel, and how would the Conservatives feel if they were under the same sort of program that the folks in the north are when it comes to their resources?

                            I would love to talk to the member for Fort McMurray—Athabasca about how he would feel if he were under the same sort of a regime in Alberta that the Northwest Territories is going to be under, imposed upon them by this legislation. My guess is that there would probably be a riot in Calgary, but that is of course speculative on my part.

                            I wonder if my friend could comment on that very issue and the contrast of the two. It would seem to me that in an egalitarian place such as this country, we would want to treat them the same.

                            • MPconblog Brian Jean 228 post Mother of Member for Fort McMurray—Athabasca

                              Mr. Speaker, today I recognize one of the most impressive Canadians I have ever met, someone who loves northern Alberta and Fort McMurray, a true pioneer and early entrepreneur, a great Canadian.

                              With her husband, she owned and operated many successful businesses over 50 years in Fort McMurray, including Fort McMurray's first newspaper, the McMurray Courier, where she acted as reporter, writer, editor, and publisher.

                              She has volunteered literally thousands of hours on countless non-profit boards. She has also volunteered thousands of hours for Canadian democracy and to uphold conservative economic principles. As a woman, she has had to fight many times for her voice to be heard and became, as a result, one of the first female members of the Fort McMurray Chamber of Commerce. On her 80th birthday, she launched her own written book, More Than Oil: Trappers, Traders and Settlers of Northern Alberta.

                              She is a trailblazer, a historian, a world traveller, a master cook and baker, continues to work more than 50 hours a week, and is the most honest person I know. She also works tirelessly to serve her family, her community, and Canada.

                              I thank Mrs. Frances Kathaleen Jean: my hero, my friend, my mother.

                              • MPndpblog ChrisCharltonMP 2909 post Income Tax Act

                                moved that Bill C-201, an act to amend the Income Tax Act (travel and accommodation deduction for tradespersons), be read the second time and referred to a committee.

                                Mr. Speaker, I cannot believe that the time has finally come to debate Bill C-201, an act to amend the Income Tax Act (travel and accommodation deduction for tradespersons). It is the very first bill I introduced in this chamber after being elected in January 2006 and it is a bill that is near and dear to my heart.

                                However, my wait is nothing compared with the wait experienced by the workers who are at the heart of my bill. The Canadian building and construction trades have been lobbying for this legislation for over 35 years. Their tenacity on this file is remarkable and ought to be indicative to the government that this issue matters deeply to the very people who have literally built our country.

                                In fact, I would be remiss if I did not publicly thank Bob Blakely, the chief operating officer of the Canadian Building Trades Unions, for his personal commitment to this bill and for never ceasing to fight for the best interests of his members. Bob knows only too well what a bumpy road it has been to get to this point today.

                                Both Liberal and Conservative governments have made promises to the building trades in the past about concrete action to come. However, those games of political footsie led exactly nowhere.

                                It is time for the games to stop and for all members in the House to stand up and be counted. Lip service is no longer good enough. I am delighted to give members the opportunity to clarify their positions in the coming vote on my bill.

                                I know, Mr. Speaker, that you follow American politics closely, so you will remember former Speaker Tip O'Neill coining the phrase “all politics is local”. It is the principle that a politician's success is directly tied to his or her ability to understand and influence the issues of constituents.

                                While that certainly encapsulates the genesis of bill that we are debating today, I introduced it because of the amazing education and awareness-raising efforts of the members of the Building and Construction Trades Council in my hometown of Hamilton.

                                In particular, I want to single out the leadership of business manager Joe Beattie, who invited me to meet with the building trades about this issue before I was even elected.

                                We can see that the Hamilton building trades are not just savvy lobbyists, they are also clairvoyant. They knew I would eventually get elected, even before I believed it myself.

                                The case that was put to me by Joe, along with the members of Carpenters Local 18, UA Local 67 and Sheetmetal Workers Local 537, made sense then, and it still makes sense now. It makes sense for workers, who would benefit from a reduction in their temporary relocation costs and a reduction in time spent unemployed. It makes sense for employers which will benefit from access to larger pools of qualified workers and reduced costs relating to participation in programs such as the temporary foreign workers program. It makes sense for the government, because it would benefit from increased long-term income tax revenues and reduced dependence on costly social programs.

                                However, let me not put the cart before the horse. Let us start at the beginning and look at the issue that my bill is seeking to address, the specific remedy that it offers and the opportunity that it represents for the government and all members of the House.

                                Right now, there are two major human resource challenges facing Canada's construction industry: regional labour shortages and barriers to labour mobility.

                                The 2011 edition of the Construction Sector Council's “Construction Looking Forward” report suggests that to replace retiring workers and maintain productivity, construction employers, collectively, must hire more than 320,000 new workers between now and 2019. While training programs and recruitment from non-traditional labour sources are part of the solution, they will not be enough to ameliorate the significant labour shortages that are projected for the decade ahead.

                                Compounding this problem is the unevenness of demand for construction workers. Some regions of the country, such as Newfoundland and Labrador, are expected to face significant worker shortages until next year. Others, such as Ontario, will offer fewer work opportunities in the short term, but many more between 2015 and 2019. A third group, including Quebec, Nova Scotia and Alberta, will offer consistently high numbers throughout the forecast period.

                                With the demand for labour thus high in some parts of the country and lower in others, it would be in everyone's best interest to facilitate the mobility of unemployed workers from one part of the country to job openings in another.

                                This would be an easy problem to solve if construction jobs were permanent, but they are not. Construction is a transitory business. When a hospital, a mall or, for that matter, a Pan Am stadium is built, the job is done. Work can last for days, weeks or months, but the bottom line is that it is not permanent and no worker can fairly be expected to move his or her family to a new city every time the workplace changes, and therein lies the rub.

                                Under current rules, construction workers often incur large personal expenses to accept jobs in other parts of the province or country because neither their travel nor accommodation expenses are tax deductible under the Income Tax Act. As a result, these costs create a huge disincentive for workers to accept work in those parts of the country that are experiencing skills shortages.

                                Figures compiled on behalf of the building and construction trades department of the AFL-CIO suggest that the average mobile worker spends approximately $3,500 of his or her own money to temporarily relocate. That is a significant barrier to the appeal of working mobile. Without wanting to be too cute, I ask my hon. colleagues to imagine what would happen in this place if we told members tomorrow that they could no longer get financial assistance for their secondary residence here in Ottawa while they are here on the job, or for their travel for that matter.

                                If that is not enough to spur us on to creating fairness for the building trades, let me just remind members that this House already acknowledged that transitory workers merit financial support, and budget 2008 provided a tax break to truck drivers to assist with mobility challenges in that industry. I am calling on us to do the right thing here today and create a labour mobility tax credit for the building and construction industry too. Specifically, my bill would allow tradespersons and indentured apprentices to deduct travel and accommodation expenses from their taxable income, so they can secure and maintain employment at a construction site that is more than 80 kilometres from their home. Adopting this bill would remove one of the largest stated barriers to labour mobility in our country and would pave the road for workers to move freely between regions of the country where their skills are in demand. For me, this is absolutely the right thing to do, and I do not believe that this issue has to be partisan. In fact, I know it is not.

                                Let me remind members than in April 2008, the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities supported my bill in intent if not by name. The two germane recommendations were numbers 1.6 and 1.7. Recommendation number 1.6 reads:

                                The Committee recommends that the federal government examine the moving expenses provision of the Income Tax Act with a view to extending this provision to individuals who must leave their principal residence to work on a temporary basis, provided their principal residence is retained.

                                Recommendation number 1.7 says:

                                The Committee recommends that the federal government provide funding to assist individuals who agree to relocate to enter employment in occupations experiencing skills shortages.

                                Both of those recommendations are spot-on.

                                Yes, these recommendations were adopted during a minority Parliament, so it may be assumed that the government members did not actually support them. However, let me provide further evidence to the contrary. Before the Standing Committee on Finance on November 19, 2012, the Conservative member for Fort McMurray—Athabasca responded to a presentation by a representative of the building trades by saying, “...I've been advocating since 2005 for a tax credit on travel and mobility”.

                                Just a month later, another report by the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities made this its 30th recommendation. It stated:

                                The Committee recommends that the Government of Canada study the anticipated cost of introducing new fiscal measures that would help people who find jobs far away from where they live, for example a tax credit for travel and lodging if a person must work more than 80 kilometres from his or her residence, and that it study the potential impact of such measures on labour mobility and labour shortages.

                                This time, the government had the majority of members on the committee, so that recommendation would not have passed without the support of the Conservatives.

                                I want to publicly thank the Conservatives who were members of the committee at that time. They are the members for Mississauga—Streetsville, Don Valley East, Okanagan—Shuswap, Brant and Calgary Northeast, and the member for Simcoe—Grey, who is now Canada's Minister of Labour. I know that the member for Mississauga—Streetsville, in particular, understands this issue and has been advocating for it inside his own caucus. Also, I hope the Minister of Labour is using her new clout to assist his efforts in every possible way. Since she has repeatedly mentioned her own family roots in Alberta's construction industry, I trust that she understands what is at stake here.

                                Certainly, all of the opposition members on the committee got it right away. I was but one member of that committee, and I was proud to note that my NDP colleagues at HUMA, the members for Hochelaga, Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup and St. John's South—Mount Pearl, have always stood four-square behind the building trades in their communities and immediately expressed their support for my bill.

                                I am also cautiously optimistic that my Liberal colleague from Cape Breton—Canso will see fit to vote for it, although truthfully I am not sure which side he was on when the issue was being discussed when the Liberals were in government, during their 13 years in office. What I do know is that in opposition he has been nothing but supportive, and I want to thank him for that.

                                This issue does have broad-based support. What is stopping it from becoming law? At one point both the Minister of Finance and the former Minister of Labour were concerned about how much my proposed tax credit would cost. They were not entirely convinced by the admittedly rough initial calculations, which showed that it would be revenue neutral, since the cost of the tax credit would be more than offset by savings in employment insurance payments that would no longer have to be made as unemployed Canadians went to work in other parts of the country.

                                However, the building trades took the minister's concern seriously and had the projections related to my bill audited by Hendry Warren. The audited numbers were given to every member of this House during the last building trades lobby day, and I trust that everyone will have familiarized themselves with the costing of my proposal. However, let us take a quick look at the numbers again just to make absolutely certain that we are all on the same page.

                                Hendry Warren estimated that there are 1.6 million construction workers in Canada. An estimated 10% of them travel each year. At an average cost of $3,500 per worker per year, a 15% tax credit would cost the government $525 per mobile worker per year, for a total cost of $84 million.

                                Working with the same number of 160,000 travelling skilled trades workers whose average weekly employment insurance benefit would be $393 per week for an average period of unemployment of four weeks if they were not working means that the government would pay $251 million in EI benefits per year. That means that the tax credit proposal in my bill would actually save the government $167 million per year.

                                Let me repeat that, Mr. Speaker, because these numbers will be germane in your consideration of whether my bill will ultimately require a royal recommendation. Far from being an expenditure, my bill would actually save the government $167 million each and every year, and that is just premised on savings on EI.

                                As the audited statement makes clear, when savings from all social programs are taken into account along with increased long-term income tax revenues from employment, the labour mobility tax credit is more likely to yield a return on the government's investment of nearly five to one. We would think the Minister of Finance would be doing a happy dance at the prospect of such a windfall.

                                The bill really is a win, win, win. As I said at the outset, workers win because the travel and accommodation costs would no longer be a barrier to accepting decent jobs for decent wages in other regions of the country; employers win because they would have access to larger pools of qualified workers without needing to resort to the costly temporary foreign workers program; the government wins by having taken a concrete step toward addressing regional skilled labour shortages, all the while reducing dependence on costly social programs and actually boosting long-term income tax revenues. It does not get much better than that.

                                Let me conclude by bringing this discussion full circle. I want to end where I began.

                                Locally and nationally, the building and construction trades have lobbied for the bill for over 35 years. They represent an industry that is critical to our economy. In fact, construction is Canada's largest private sector industry. Its direct impact is immense. Construction accounts for 12% of Canada's GDP.

                                The industry has more than 260,000 businesses, employing more than a million Canadians. It is responsible for installing, repairing, and renovating more than $150 billion worth of infrastructure every single year. It is a threshold industry on which everything else is based.

                                In a very real sense, the building and construction trades have built our country. It is time for us to shore up their work. It is time for us to heed their call for action. It is time for us to provide them with a tax credit for travel and accommodation expenses when they accept work more than 80 kilometres away from their home. It is time to pass my bill.

                                • MPnews news Le parc national Wood Buffalo : la plus grande réserve de ciel étoilé au monde - Journal L'Avantage
                                  Brian Jean, député de Fort McMurray—Athabasca, au nom de Leona Aglukkaq, ministre canadienne de l'Environnement et ministre responsable de Parcs Canada, a annoncé aujourd'hui que la Société royale d'astronomie du Canada a désigné le parc ...and more » read more
                                  Aug 02, 2013 9:01 am> |
                                  • MPnews news World's Largest Dark Sky Preserve Established in Wood Buffalo National Park - Sacramento Bee
                                    2, 2013 /CNW/ - Mr. Brian Jean, Member of Parliament for Fort McMurray—Athabasca on behalf of the Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, Canada's Environment Minister and Minister for Parks Canada, announced today the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada's ... read more
                                    Aug 02, 2013 6:28 am> |
                                    • MPnews news Le parc national Wood Buffalo : la plus grande réserve de ciel étoilé au monde - CNW Telbec (Communiqué de presse)
                                      FORT SMITH, NT, le 2 août 2013 /CNW/ - M. Brian Jean, député de Fort McMurray—Athabasca, au nom de l'honorable Leona Aglukkaq, ministre canadienne de l'Environnement et ministre responsable de Parcs Canada, a annoncé aujourd'hui que la ...and more » read more
                                      Aug 02, 2013 6:05 am> |
                                      • MPnews news Le parc national Wood Buffalo : la plus grande réserve de ciel étoilé au monde - CNW Telbec (Communiqué de presse)
                                        FORT SMITH, NT, le 2 août 2013 /CNW/ - M. Brian Jean, député de Fort McMurray—Athabasca, au nom de l'honorable Leona Aglukkaq, ministre canadienne de l'Environnement et ministre responsable de Parcs Canada, a annoncé aujourd'hui que la ...and more » read more
                                        Aug 02, 2013 6:03 am> |
                                        • MPnews news World's Largest Dark Sky Preserve Established in Wood Buffalo National Park - Canada NewsWire (press release)
                                          2, 2013 /CNW/ - Mr. Brian Jean, Member of Parliament for Fort McMurray—Athabasca on behalf of the Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, Canada's Environment Minister and Minister for Parks Canada, announced today the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada's ...and more » read more
                                          Aug 02, 2013 6:03 am> |
                                          • MPnews news World's Largest Dark Sky Preserve Established in Wood Buffalo National Park - PR Newswire (press release)
                                            2, 2013 /CNW/ - Mr. Brian Jean, Member of Parliament for Fort McMurray—Athabasca on behalf of the Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, Canada's Environment Minister and Minister for Parks Canada, announced today the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada's ... read more
                                            Aug 02, 2013 6:03 am> |
                                            • MPnews news World's Largest Dark Sky Preserve Established in Wood Buffalo National Park - Canada NewsWire (press release)
                                              2, 2013 /CNW/ - Mr. Brian Jean, Member of Parliament for Fort McMurray—Athabasca on behalf of the Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, Canada's Environment Minister and Minister for Parks Canada, announced today the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada's ... read more
                                              Aug 02, 2013 6:01 am> |
                                              • MPconblog BarryDevolin_MP 33 post Expansion and Conservation of Canada’s National Parks Act

                                                The Chair appreciates that the member has respected his time allocation this evening.

                                                Questions and comments. The hon. member for Fort McMurray—Athabasca.

                                                • MPconblog MPmarkwarawa 621 post Criminal Code

                                                  Mr. Speaker, it is a real honour to speak to the bill.

                                                  I want to share with the House how the bill came about. About two years ago, a constituent visited me in my office. She was a mom and she told me the story about her daughter who had been sexually assaulted by the neighbour right across the street. That was a horrific experience for the whole family. Then the horror continued as the courts permitted the offender to serve a large portion of the sentence at home.

                                                  The family lived in terror, keeping its blinds closed. The members of the family were afraid to go out because they might have seen the offender. Every time they would return to their neighbourhood and home, a home that should be safe in a neighbourhood they loved, from work or school, the whole family, the mother, the father, the siblings would have this horrible feeling in their gut of whether they would see this person and how would they respond to the person.

                                                  It was a very friendly, close-knit neighbourhood, with neighbourhood barbecues on the street, and that all ended when the courts provided the offender the opportunity to serve the sentence at home, which was right across the street from the victim.

                                                  I appreciate my colleagues across the way expressing concern that this may be a knee-jerk reaction. I can assure them this is not. Shortly after reviewing this horrific story, I contacted other members, including the member for Fort McMurray—Athabasca. I knew of his legal experience. Through the consultation process, even talking to members across the way, Bill C-489 was developed.

                                                  I thank all members of the House for indicating support for the bill to go to the next step, the justice committee. It is important we develop something that will consider the victims and the impact of sentencing on the victims, and I believe the bill does that.

                                                  I thank the legal experts from private members' business. I thank the Minister of Justice and the minister's staff, particularly Dominic. I thank the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and the member for Okanagan—Coquihalla, the member for Brampton West, the member for Kildonan—St. Paul, the opposition members and the critics. I would not have been able to move forward without their help.

                                                  The duty of each of us is to make Parliament work. We are doing that with Bill C-489. I look forward to critiquing it, amending it, so it makes it even safer.

                                                  On behalf of all Canadians, I thank all members of Parliament as we work to make all Canadian homes safer.

                                                  • MPconblog BarryDevolin_MP 71 post Safer Witnesses Act

                                                    In terms of the content of the member's speech, obviously, all members are required to be relevant to the matter that is before the House, and I would urge the hon. member for Fort McMurray—Athabasca to do this.

                                                    Resuming debate, the hon. member for Fort McMurray—Athabasca.

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Fort McMurray—Athabasca

The electoral district of Fort McMurray--Athabasca (Alberta) has a population of 100,805 with 71,621 registered voters and 195 polling divisions.


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Brian Jean MP
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